About

infodio

Etymology: from in (“in, at, on”) + fodiō (“dig”)

Verb: present active īnfodiō, present infinitive īnfodere, perfect active īnfōdī, supine īnfossum

dig in or up, bury in the earth, inter, make by digging; excavate.

This is a bilingual site, please click on English or Spanish flags for corresponding version.

The mission of Infodio is to uncover. To expose. To reveal. What began as my personal blog, where I would wax about the corruption in my native Venezuela, has now become more than a pastime. Muckraking, in the finest sense of the term, has become my vocation. I am an investigative blogger, a publisher, if you will, devoted to justice and transparency in countries with a pitiable excuse for rule of law and where, sadly, law enforcement and judicial systems are culprits and accomplices. And you, the readers, are the reason this effort is possible. This website is supported by me, and from contributions received by readers (hint, hint).

As the definition above suggests, this website intends to expose the knaves, the crooks, the cronies, the charlatans, the “enchufados,” the mountebanks, the boligarchs, the impostors, the conmen, however you wish to define them, the criminal element that feeds at the feet of corrupt governments. Whoever they are. And wherever they may be. And regardless if they committed their crimes ten days or ten years ago. My focus is the Briefcase Bandit. Those who are literally taking money that would otherwise belong to “the people”, in nations rich with natural resources.

Those exposed at Infodio will, for the most part, get away with their crimes. However, I have learned that the one thing these shameless parasites crave is respectability. Consequently, public exposure terrifies them. To my dismay, I’ve learned that many journalists and public leaders lack the guts to state publicly what I write in this blog. Some of them get threatened with lawsuits, while others just get bought off. Here we will ventilate issues that are not properly exposed in the mainstream media. My hope is that visiting journalists will come to realize that the documents published here are genuine, and the analysis provided is a good faith effort at getting at the truth. I also hope that whenever material published in this site is used by traditional journalists (here's looking at you Reuters, WSJ, Bloomberg, etc.), they'll have the decency of citing the source appropriately. Other contributors may publish here from time to time, and articles of interest seen elsewhere may also be reposted here. However, this site is edited by me: Alek Boyd. I started blogging about Venezuelan politics in October 2002. I’m stubborn. Recently, the LatAm bureau chief of The Economist described me in an email as “a fanatically anti-Chavez blogger but also has a reputation as a good investigative journalist.​” The issue at hand was my having shed light on one corruption case in Ecuador. My reply to it was: "If being pro democracy, human, civil and political rights, pro free market, rule of law, etc., is to be a fanatic, then guilty as charged.​" Fortunately, my mission is getting results, so much so that this site has been censored by Nicolas Maduro's regime in Venezuela.

I promise my readers every effort for accuracy, as well as an assurance that we will immediately publish corrections when this website fails to meet the highest standards of journalism that are applied in established and reputed media where I collaborate regularly. I welcome criticism and any good-faith counter-arguments. I don’t bite. I am not, however, interested in silly polemics with people too blinded by ideology to acknowledge corruption that has corroded certain governments into an abyss of inefficiency.

Be advised, I am partial to writing about matters from my home country, Venezuela. But the more I learn about corruption in places such as Ecuador, Nicaragua, Kazakhstan, and even the U.S., the more I see the problem ignores borders. Recently I’ve been stunned for how easily (and cheaply) the targets of this website can buy off the services of lawyers, lobbyists, and even private intelligence agencies in the U.S. and Europe. There’s room here to expose the enablers of corruption, too.

Readers are encouraged to submit comments, suggestions, tips, and leaks. I promise to maintain your anonymity if you so request it.

English